50 Examples of Hyperbole

Hyperbole is a rhetorical or literary figure that consists of exaggerating an element of reality to give greater expressive force to the message.

Exaggeration can consist of magnifying or diminishing a characteristic or quality attributed to a thing, person or situation. In addition to emphasizing its meaning, hyperbole helps create effects like humor and irony.

Hyperboles in everyday speech

Everyday language is a source of abundant examples of hyperbole, that is, of exaggerations that emphasize the meaning of a sentence. We present here some frequent examples, and we highlight in bold the words in which the hyperbole or exaggeration resides.

  1. I have told you one million times. (He means that the calls for attention have been too many).
  2. I’m dying of love for you. (That she suffers a lot for the love she feels towards the person in question)
  3. With that big nose gouge out anyone’s eye. (That nose is very big)
  4. I’m so hungry I would eat myself a cow. (he is very hungry)
  5. I’m going to grow roots from so much waiting. (Which has a long time waiting)
  6. First dead rather than eat chicken liver. (Who is reluctant to eat chicken liver because of the displeasure it causes him)
  7. I have called you Thousands times. (That she has called him many times)
  8. there is no day in which I should not repeat the same thing to you. (That he is tired of repeating the same instruction)
  9. All the world He is watching what I do. (That he feels observed by people who know him)
  10. I’ve got one million of things to do today. (Which is overwhelmed with occupations)
  11. Does Five hundred years I await a response to my request. (Who has been waiting for a response for a long time)
  12. The car was so hot you could fry an egg in the hood. (That the heat inside the vehicle is too much)
  13. I’m so thirsty that I would drink a barrel of water. (who is very thirsty)
  14. There was ten thousand people before me in line at the bank. (That there were many people in the bank)
  15. I melt of heat (That feels very hot)
  16. At this rate, we will delay an eternity in finishing the job. (That they are taking longer than necessary to fulfill their work obligations)
  17. This petrified from fear. (That fear has incapacitated him to react)
  18. If that athlete keeps running like this, at any time will start to fly. (That the athlete is surprisingly fast)
  19. Watch the news me sick. (That the news indisposes him)
  20. There is nothing let him escape. (That is habitually attentive to important things or details)
  21. I’m so tired it hurts the soul. (That fatigue causes a lot of pain)
  22. That’s what you get for doing twenty things at once. (Who suffers the consequences of doing too many things at once)
  23. Am frozen. (That feels very cold)
  24. You are the most beautiful woman in world. (What do you think the woman in question is beautiful)
  25. This market bag weighs tonne. (That the bag is very heavy)
  26. the night was done eternal. (That she felt that the night passed slowly)
  27. No one don’t know his name. (That many people know the subject in question)
  28. I’m dying of laughter (That an issue makes him laugh a lot)
  29. every minute of the day I dedicate it to thinking of you. (Who often thinks about the person in question)
  30. I wouldn’t marry you nor that you were the last man on Earth. (He doesn’t want to commit to that person)
You may be interested:  Textual Prototypes

It may interest you: What is hyperbole?

hyperboles in poetry

In literature we can find numerous examples of poems with hyperboles that make use of this figure of speech.

1

With my crying the stones soften
their natural hardness and break it…
Garcilaso de la Vega, of Eclogue Yo

two

The day you love me will have more light than June
(…) and there will be more roses together
than in the entire month of May.
Amaro Nervo, from the poem The day you love me

3

your eyes have
d’love I don’t know what,
that yelan me, rob me,
they hurt me, they kill me,
that kill me, kill me to faith.
From an anonymous Spanish poem of the 17th century

4

Once upon a man stuck a nose,
once upon a superlative nose,
Once upon a sayón nose and write.
Francisco de Quevedo, from the sonnet To a man with a big nose

5

Nothing more shaker than your hip,
rebellious to the pressure of attire…
Carlos Pezoa Véliz, from the poem A una Morena

6

Seeing you smile at the window
kneel down the believer…
Carlos Pezoa Véliz, from the poem To a blonde

7

My thirst, my boundless longing, my hesitant path!
Dark channels where eternal thirst follows,
and fatigue follows, and infinite pain.
Pablo Neruda, from the book Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair.

8

Everything was fire at that time. burned
the beach around you.
Raphael Alberto, from the poem Returns of love as it was

9

I think the sky is coming to the ground,
and did wrong, sir (if it could be
that he came to the ground)
that the ground is no longer there to live on.
Lope de Vega, from the play Loving, serving and waiting.

10

You may be interested:  10 Examples of Expository Texts

He has turned the flow of his tears
in the water of the rivers that cross the two Castillas,
capable of causing flooding
Francisco de Quevedo

hyperbole in narrative

In novels and short stories we can also find the frequent use of literary hyperbole. We point out here some examples of important Hispanic American authors.

1

Ultimately, he became so engrossed in his reading that he spent his nights reading from clear to clear, and the days from cloudy to cloudy; and so, from little sleep and much reading, his brain dried up in such a way that he came to lose his mind.
From Miguel de Cervantes, from the novel Don Quixote de la Mancha.

two

…retained his extraordinary strength, which allowed him to bring down a horse by grabbing its ears.
Gabriel García Márquez, from the novel One Hundred Years of Solitude.

3

But deep down I couldn’t conceive that the boy the gypsies took away was the same Atarván who ate half a suckling pig for lunch and whose winds withered the flowers.
Gabriel García Márquez, from the novel One Hundred Years of Solitude.

4

But the tribe of Melquíades, according to the globetrotters, had been erased from the face of the earth for having exceeded the limits of human knowledge.
Gabriel García Márquez, from the novel One Hundred Years of Solitude.

5

It was difficult to admit that that irreparable old man was the only balance of a man whose power had been so great that he once asked what time it is and they had answered the ones you ordered, my general.
Gabriel García Márquez, novel The Autumn of the Patriarch.

6

The man was tall and so thin that he seemed always in profile.
Mario Vargas Llosa, from the novel The War of the End of the World.

7

One could spend a lifetime listening to the nocturne, and the scherzo was played as if by the hands of fairies. Beba liked Strauss better because he was strong, truly a German Don Juan, with those horns and trombones that gave her goosebumps – which was surprisingly literal to me.
Julio Cortázar, from the story The Maenads.

8

It was never late, the vibration of the sun on the track and the bodies dilated the vertigo to the point of nausea.
Julio Cortázar, from the story The South Highway

9

She knew, because she had felt it firsthand, how powerful the fire of a look can be. She is able to light up the sun itself.
Laura Esquivel, from the novel Como agua para chocolate.

10

You may be interested:  100 Examples of Sentence Modifiers

After that scrutinizing gaze that penetrated clothing, nothing would ever be the same.
Laura Esquivel, from the novel Como agua para chocolate.

You may also like:

  • Literary figures
  • 50 examples of metaphor.
  • 60 examples of simile.
  • 34 examples of anaphora.
  • Onomatopoeia